Monday, August 6, 2018

Overcoming rhinitis adherence challenges

- Jennifer Middleton, MD, MPH

The current issue of AFP includes an overview of "Chronic Nonallergic Rhinitis" (the newer term for "vasomotor rhinitis"). The article includes tips to distinguish allergic from nonallergic rhinitis along with treatment regimens. Many of the medications that are useful for allergic rhinitis are also useful for nonallergic rhinitis, including intranasal corticosteroids, intranasal antihistamines, oral decongestants - with the addition of intranasal ipratropium for nonallergic symptoms. Unfortunately, patient adherence to these intranasal medications tends to be low.

For many patients, rhinitis symptoms are inconsistent and episodic, waxing and waning with seasonal changes and exposure to triggers. While not taking intranasal medications when symptoms and triggers are absent may be reasonable, taking them only when symptoms are severe (and not more moderate) can result in decreased efficacy, increased physician visits, and increased healthcare costs. Many intranasal medications for rhinitis also have unpleasant tastes and smells that can affect adherence. Cost is another factor; some of these medications are not available in generic versions and can be expensive. Interestingly, personality type and gender may also correlate with intranasal medication adherence; in one study, men with higher "neuroticism" scores were less adherent to allergy medications, while men with higher "agreeableness" or "conscientiousness" scores were more adherent. Among women in this same study, however, personality traits did not correlate with adherence.

Knowing when patients are not using their intranasal medications is important to accurately assess treatment efficacy as well as the risk of worsening co-morbid conditions like asthma. The Allergic Rhinitis Treatment Satisfaction and Preference (ARTSP) scale provides information about a patient's preferences regarding intranasal treatment, which can guide physician and patient decision-making regarding specific medications. Prescribing an intranasal medication with characteristics that patients prefer (odor, taste, comfort, delivery device, cost) may increase adherence. Other solutions for increasing adherence include problem-solving solutions to identified barriers with patients and using text messaging to send patients daily reminders to use their intranasal medications.

You can read more about rhinitis treatment by using this AFP keyword search. There's also an AFP By Topic on Allergy and Anaphylaxis, which includes this reference on "Diagnosing Rhinitis: Allergic vs. Nonallergic" and an Allergic Rhinitis Treatment Guideline from 2015.

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